Censorship, Freedom of Expression, Movies

China does not want you to see this film

a touch of sin 2

The title of the film is “A Touch of Sin”. I saw this film and I really liked it. It has 94% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 78 reviews. The movie won best screenplay at Cannes Film Festival.

Synopsis:

A Touch of Sin was inspired by four shocking (and true) events that forced the world’s fastest growing economy into a period of self-examination.

Written and directed by master filmmaker Jia Zhangke, this daring, poetic and grand-scale film focuses on four characters, each living in different provinces, who are driven to violent ends.

Notes:

Synopsis was copied from official site of film. Click here to go to official website of the film.

The film is composed of four different segments. The four incidents depicted in the segments are not directly related. If you don’t like one particular segment, you can skip to next segment. I personally liked all the segments.

Click here to read article published by The New Republic. The article is titled “China does not want you to see this year’s best Chinese film”. When you go to The New Republic website, you might see a pop up asking you to subscribe. You don’t have to subscribe to read the article. Click the close button at top right hand corner of the pop up to close it.

Unfortunately, this movie is not available on Netflix. Check your local libary. They might have it. You can borrow the movie from Toronto Public Libary. This movie could not be found in the Markham Public Library catalogue.

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Freedom of Expression, State Surveillance

Repeal Bill C-51!

The Bill gives the government and law enforcement agencies far-reaching powers to collect information on Canadians without proper oversight and in contravention of privacy rights protected in the Charter.

It allows our national security force, CSIS, to carry out undefined “measures” against perceived threats, including anything that interferes with Canada’s “economic or financial stability”.

The problem is that a wide range of legitimate groups involved in advocacy on environmental, First Nations, labor and social justice issues might well be regarded by the government as a threat to the country’s “economic stability”.

Five former supreme court justices, two former privacy commissioner, the Canadian Bar Association are just a few of thousands of people opposed to this bill.

This is what University of Ottawa Law Professor Craig Forcese says about Bill C-51:

“CSIS may come to judges asking them to bless in advance constitutional breaches. The proceeding will be secret. Only the government will be represented. There is no appeal mechanism. The person affected will not know about it. They may never know who caused the problems that they then would encounter… We just have never seen anything like this in Canada before.”
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